Bel Nemeton Q&A: Part III

The following is part of my Publisher’s author interview for the short story “Bel Nemeton.” The template for my upcoming novel of the same name, “Bel Nemeton” can be found in the anthology After Avalon, from 18th Wall Productions.

Q) Merlin is one of the most influential and long-standing of Arthurian
characters. What inspired you to use him–and send your heroes on a
globetrotting quest to find his tomb?,

Of all Arthuriana’s characters, I felt Merlin had the widest potential for an “After Avalon” story. I envision him as a Dark Ages proto-Renaissance Man, with a whole world of possibilities open to him. Taking that sentiment literally, I imagined Merlin wandering the length of the known world seeking to fill the void left by the fall of Camelot with new experiences and encounters.

Initially, I conceived of Vivian and Jake primarily as a lens to reveal Merlin’s travels as they searched for what would be the archeological discovery of the century. As I began writing “Bel Nemeton,” however, they quickly assumed a life and agency of their own.

Drop in on Wednesday for another question from the interview and check out earlier answers in previous blog posts.

Follow Jon at @BlackOnBlues on Twitter.

Bel Nemeton Q&A: Part II

The following is part of my Publisher’s author interview for the short story “Bel Nemeton.” The template for my upcoming novel of the same name, “Bel Nemeton” can be found in the anthology After Avalon, from 18th Wall Productions.

Q) Other than your story, what is your favorite Arthurian tale (regardless
of medium)?

A) I have a special fondness for the 2004 film “King Arthur,” starting Clive Owen and Keira Knightley. I appreciate its late Roman/early Dark Ages setting and its exploration of the interplay between the various cultures in Britain at that time, including Celtic, Roman, and Saxon. Those are elements I explore in “Bel Nemeton” as well.

Though I am confused by why all the Saxons in the film have American accents.

Drop in on Tuesday for another question from the interview and check out earlier answers in previous blog posts.

Follow Jon at @BlackOnBlues on Twitter.

Bel Nemeton Q&A: Part I

The following is part of my Publisher’s author interview for the short story “Bel Nemeton.” The template for my upcoming novel of the same name, “Bel Nemeton” can be found in the anthology After Avalon, from 18th Wall Productions.

Q) How did you discover the Arthurian Legends? What do they mean to you?

A) My family is, in part, Welsh, Scottish, and Irish. My father’s middle name is Merwyn, a name related to Merlin. He was my introduction to Arthuriana. As a child, his tales of Merlin, Arthur, and the knights were my bedtime stories.

I am fascinated that a mythology so rooted in a specific time and place could become so ubiquitous. For nearly a millennia, the Arthur Cycle has been both a mirror and a painter’s pallet for the values, hopes, fears, and concerns of vastly different societies. Part of this, I believe, stems from characters that offer a complete set of archetypes which represent the virtues, vices, dreams, and obstacles that exist within each of us.

Drop in on Monday for another question from the interview

Follow Jon at @BlackOnBlues on Twitter.

Writing a Sixth Century Road Trip

I am still doing research for “Caledfwlch” and will be for many more months. I have, however, also begun writing. As with “Bel Nemeton,” the second book in the series features a split perspective with part of the action split between a contemporary time frame and a Sixth century Arthurian one (other, shorter, perspectives may also be introduced, I haven’t decided).

Part of the Sixth century storyline involves Myrddi (Merlin), Bleys (Blaze), and Arthur (for reasons of aesthetic preference, I’ve kept the king’s name in its familiar form rather than reverting to its Celtic versions). Traveling overland from a nebulously placed Camelot (there are so many suggested locations for a historical Camelot, none of them terribly convincing) to Pictland.

It would be entirely possible to fast forward through all that and simply resume narrative upon arriving among the Picts. If this was a short story, I certainly would. In a novel, however, I can afford to give some detail to their travels, using the opportunity to bring the world of Sixth century Britain to life, provide some character exposition, and insert a little derring-do.

The research underpinning this part of the story has been every bit as challenging as the research into the Picts (see my previous post). There is, of course, no authoritative map of Britain in the early-to-mid Sixth century. Even determining what lands and kingdoms Mryrddin and his party would pass through on their journey requires sifting through vague and contradictory information before making my own assumptions (possibly shaded a little by dramatic potential).

To the best of my ability, their travels will take the thrio through Powys, Pengwern, Elmet, Reghed, Damnonia, and Dal Riata before entering Pictland.

Along the way, each of those lands will get a little bit of color, if not a small story. Pengwern contains an abandoned Roman city whose name appears to be a Latinization of the Britonnic term for “City of the Werewolf” (really). How could I not play with that? Elmet, I think, will be Bleys’s home turf, good for some exposition about the history of Myrddin’s tutor. Reghed is often considered to be the “Gorre” of Arthurian legend, which gives some hints about what I may do there. Unlike the previous lands, which were are all Brittonic or Welsh, Dal Riata is the land of the Scoti (Gaelic speaking invaders from Ireland from which the name “Scotland” is ultimately derived). So there’s some good opportunity for cross-cultural tensions and, I think, maybe a bar brawl.

After that, it’s into Pictland and Sixth century Wally World (just kidding, mostly).

Knit-Picting

Book Two in the series isn’t due until May 2016. Nevertheless, I’ve already begun my research. The story will feature the Picts prominently. Delving into what is known about the Picts has been both fascinating and challenging.

Of all the Celtic peoples (acknowledging of course, that even the term “Celt” is anachronistic) of the Isles, the Picts are arguably the most enigmatic. Aside from archeological evidence, almost everything known about Picts comes from other peoples … and even that is not a large corpus of information. So it might appear to be an open question, what was a Pict?

In the absence of a large volume of hard data, it appears many people have treated the Picts as a blank canvas on which to project their own ideas, hopes, and fears. Often, this leads to depiction (no pun intended) of Picts as a kind of uber-Celt, with every trait common associated with Celts exaggerated. Others portray Picts as the ultimate “other,” ignore solid evidence as they portray Picts as non-Indo-European (to say nothing of Celt) and an outlier or exception to much that is commonly understood about human society.

Popular conceptions of the Picts … as technologically primitive, socially primitive, and extremely warlike appear deeply ingrained in both popular consciousness and mass media – from Robert E. Howard to the 2004 Clive Owen/Keira Knightley film “King Arthur.” There may be a kernel of truth in the last aspect, sources from multiple cultures describe Picts as notorious pirates and, certainly, they were one of the barbarian groups troubling Rome and even southern Britons. It is difficult, however, to build a case they were more “barbariany” than other barbarians. Conceptions of technological and social primitivism, however, are utterly erroneous. Archeological evidence supports that Pictish material culture and technology were on par with their other Celtic and Saxon neighbors. In fact, in some areas, notably metal working and artistry (Pictish art tended toward the naturalistic, in contrast with the stylized forms of their neighbors) a case could be made they were slightly ahead of the curve. Socially, while Pictland apparently lacked the larger settlements of southern Britain, its political and religious systems were also on par with their neighbors.

At this point, as presented in my story, the Picts will adhere strongly to the model supported by archeology and other scholarly research … while also featuring a nod to those more fanciful conceptions of myth and legend (especially of the Robert E. Howard variety).